13 Comments

  1. Lois Schock
    February 5, 2018 @ 11:41 pm

    I’m in awe of your talents! Do you paint larger paintings i.e. 24″ X 24″? I’ve admired some of the paintings done by Marshall Henricks. In particular, large jugs. Then I discovered you! Jeffrey I’ve traveled through much of your artwork, writings and studios. You’re a delight to behold!

    Reply

    • Jeffrey Hayes
      February 6, 2018 @ 2:07 pm

      Thank you Lois! Yes, I do try to do at least a few larger pieces a year – I completed a 24×30 commissioned painting in December, and as part of my project to do one larger (for me) painting each week in 2018, I do plan to try doing a few of those dimensions. I know and admire Marshall’s work – we have a gallery in common (Powers Gallery in Acton MA)

      Reply

  2. Collette
    February 6, 2018 @ 8:00 am

    Amazing work Jeffrey. Thank you for the write up above, it gives me an extra appreciation. I love your style.

    Reply

    • Jeffrey Hayes
      February 6, 2018 @ 2:08 pm

      Thank you Collette – I’m glad you enjoyed reading it!

      Reply

  3. Manon
    February 6, 2018 @ 11:17 pm

    Hello M.JEFFREY
    I am admiring of your work ….Every time I read you I’m learning something new and you thank you for it.A question; for fast drying do you work with the liquin.

    Reply

    • Jeffrey Hayes
      February 10, 2018 @ 2:26 am

      Thanks Manon – I’m glad you find it helpful!
      I do not like Liquin at all. For fast drying, I use Black Oil, but only for the underpainting.

      Reply

  4. Rick M
    February 13, 2018 @ 5:10 pm

    Where do you buy black oil, I’ve done quite a few searches and cannot seem to find it online? Galkyd seems to work for drying for me overnight but it sounds like black oil sets harder and I wouldn’t mind trying it out.

    Reply

  5. Jim Serrett
    February 19, 2018 @ 10:19 pm

    Jeff if you use Black oil in the underpainting, I am curious what medium are you using in next layers.

    Reply

    • Jeffrey Hayes
      February 20, 2018 @ 2:43 pm

      Jim: For the upper layers I generally use a 4:1:1 mixture of turpentine, linseed, and stand oil. I also use it very sparingly – a few drops mixed into the paint nuts to get the right consistency. That’s almost always enough, though sometimes if needed I’ll put a few additional drops of linseed oil in. For any further thinning I just use OMS.

      Reply

      • Jim Serrett
        February 25, 2018 @ 4:47 pm

        Thanks Jeff, I really like the color saturation and surface quality of your paintings, your objects have this great sense of weight to them. I have got to see one in the real. Thanks for sharing all of your work and blogging your process.

        Reply

  6. Rosie Foshee
    March 5, 2019 @ 2:29 am

    I believe this is the best article I have read about the grisaille technique. You have explained all the why’s where other articles have not covered it all, and the process. Your works of art are beautiful, a type of painting that will hang in one’s thoughts, and that means you have painted some true works of art, that will be handed down throughout the ages, and cherished.

    Reply

    • Jeffrey Hayes
      March 5, 2019 @ 12:34 pm

      Thanks Rosie – I’m glad the article was helpful!

      Reply

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